Supreme Court Violent Video Games

In this June 24, 2011 photo, Grand Theft Auto video game on PlayStation 3 is displayed at Best Buy in Mountain View, Calif. The Supreme Court says California cannot ban the rental or sale of violent video games to children. The high court agreed Monday with a federal court's decision to throw out California's ban on the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. (AP Photo/Pakuma)

Trump has suggested rating both games and movies for violence. Such ratings already exist.

Following an outcry over violent games such as 1992's "Mortal Kombat," the Entertainment Software Ratings Board was established in 1994 by the Entertainment Software Association to give each game a rating based on five-categories ranging from "E'' for "Everyone" to "Adults Only" rating for those 18 and older.

The ratings suggest an age range and the type of content. The "mature" rating, for example, indicates the content is "generally suitable for ages 17 and up" and that the game "may contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language."

In 2011 , the Supreme Court rejected a California law banning the sale of violent video games to children. The decision claimed that video games, like other media, are protected by the First Amendment.

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In the majority, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote that the government can't regulate depictions of violence, which he said were age-old, anyway: "Grimm's Fairy Tales, for example, are grim indeed."

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