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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, May 8, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. 21st Birthday. Patterson/Paetro. Little, Brown 2. Sooley. John Grisham. ...

"The Secret History of Home Economics" by: Danielle Dreilinger; W.W. Norton (348 pages, $27.95) ——— Danielle Dreilinger's "The Secret History of Home Economics: How Trailblazing Women Harnessed the Power of Home and Changed the Way We Live" is a fascinating history of the field and of the contributions of some very determined women. It is also a revealing account of the title's reverse: how ...

"Moon of the Snowblind," written and illustrated by Gary Kelley; Ice Cube Press (184 pages, $19.99) The history of the Indian Wars is often told from a high-altitude perspective of skirmishes, treaties, victories and defeats. This obscures what it meant to those wrapped up in its muddled battle lines and sudden, inexplicable cruelties. In this astounding graphic historical novel about the 1857 ...

"Things We Lost to the Water" by Eric Nguyen; Alfred A. Knopf (304 pages, $26.95) ——— Eric Nguyen's moving debut novel explores the importance of stories. "Things We Lost to the Water" is about a Vietnamese family in New Orleans and the story that the mother, Huong, tells herself about how she came to arrive in the United States with her two sons and without her husband. Huong revisits the ...

I read these books in December, before there was a COVID-19 vaccine, before there was an end to the endless presidential election, and they were just what I needed. Lighter than my usual fare but entertaining, they were both more complex than a rom-com, less demanding than a serious novel. "The Bookshop of Second Chances" by Jackie Fraser (Ballantine, 438 pages, $17) is a pleasant story, ...

"Crossing the River" by Carol Smith; Abrams Press (272 pages, $26) ——— Most grief tales turn inward. The author feels compelled to figure out why he or she has joined the worst club in the world, why death has come knocking and how to survive the insanity that follows. These books are written out of emotional and existential need. Surely some purpose will grow from this tragedy. Surely it's ...

Need a thrilling thriller? A timely nonfiction collection? A trip back to a literary corner of 1920s London? Here they are ... and all in paperback, too. "Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line" by Deepa Anappara (Random House, $18). The first novel from Anappara, a journalist who spent years working in Mumbai and Delhi, India, won the Edgar Award last month for best novel, presented by the Mystery ...

Stacey Abrams' latest novel, "While Justice Sleeps," feels modern until the protagonist comes home from a horrendous day and listens to annoying then menacing voicemails — left on a landline, attached to an answering machine, that beeps in between calls. Why did she make such an anachronistic choice for the fictional 26-year-old U.S. Supreme Court law clerk at the heart of this sprawling ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, May 1, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. Sooley. John Grisham. Doubleday 2. Finding Ashley. Danielle Steel. ...

Manuel and Geiszel Godoy are military veterans, and they believe deeply in social justice. But above all, they are entrepreneurs who saw an underdeveloped sector in their industry and dove in. "We have to show that we can pull a Tyler Perry as a community," Manuel Godoy, president of Black Sands Entertainment, says in a recent video interview. "The idea is that the bigger the company gets, the ...

"The Newcomer" by Mary Kay Andrews; St. Martin’s Press (448 pages, $28.99) ——— On the rare occasions that I’m driving on the Pinellas barrier islands and spot an OG beach motel — those low-slung, cozy, pastel-painted relics tucked in among the towering condos and raucous bars — I feel a little warm tug of nostalgia for the funky, friendly places I remember. Mary Kay Andrews’ imagination works ...

"Finding the Mother Tree" by Suzanne Simard; Alfred A. Knopf (368 pages, $28.95) ——— Episodes of the cult television series "Twin Peaks" (1990-91) featured monologues with the enigmatic Log Lady, played to deadpan perfection by actress Catherine Coulson. She would cradle a cut of Ponderosa pine like a baby, channeling its koans. As a forester, biologist and ecological activist, Suzanne Simard ...

"Secrets of Happiness" by Joan Silber; Counterpoint (288 pages, $27) ——— We don't want to acknowledge it, but our lives are more transactional than we care to admit. We make trade-offs, weigh accounts, seek payback. Is our complicated relationship with money the root of the resentment grinding away in our hearts? We pretend wealth doesn't matter even as we bristle over its absence. But here's ...

Introducing Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and writer of children's books. The former actress' literary debut, titled "The Bench" and illustrated by Christian Robinson, is set to hit shelves June 8. The book, inspired by her husband and firstborn child's father-son bond, is based on a Father's Day poem Meghan wrote for Prince Harry a month after welcoming baby Archie in 2019. In a statement ...

Over a year into the pandemic, your bookshelves may be so crowded with books that you can’t imagine adding another. But a 3-year-old dog named Stella will have you rethinking that. Not familiar with the brown pup with a white belly, a mix of Catahoula and Australian cattle dog? She’s quite the social media sensation, with 788,000 followers on Instagram, 101,000 followers on YouTube and 28,000 ...

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of the books "Lincoln's Melancholy" and "Powers of Two," has resigned from his positions as editor in chief of the Believer magazine and artistic and executive director of the Black Mountain Institute. On March 24, staff of the institute, a literary arts center within the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the publisher of the Believer magazine, were notified via ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, April 24, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. A Gambling Man. David Baldacci. Grand Central 2. Ocean Prey. John ...

PIHLADELPHIA — Before Michelle Zauner wrote "Crying in H Mart," her heartbreakingly beautiful memoir about grief, food, and her Korean American identity, she had already created two works of art about losing her mother, Chongmi, to cancer in 2014: the Japanese Breakfast albums "Psychopomp" and "Soft Sounds from Another Planet." "Psychopomp" opens with "In Heaven," with a verse about the family ...

Anytime Elissa Washuta thought she was holding back or not using her true voice while writing and editing her new book “White Magic,” she channeled the energy of the creator of the cult classic TV show “Twin Peaks.” “If I ever felt like doing something safe, I’d think, ‘If David Lynch was allowed to make ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 as he did for Showtime, surely I can have a little bit of a time ...

SAN DIEGO — Caitlin Rother did not set out to become a true-crime writer. But if you look back at the San Diego author's life, the clues were there all along. When she was a general-assignment reporter for the Berkshire Eagle and the Springfield Union-News in western Massachusetts in the late 1980s, Rother spent her spare time reading about sensational murder cases and devious criminals in New ...

"That Good Night: Life and Medicine in the Eleventh Hour" by Sunita Puri; Penguin (320 pages, $16.99, paperback) ——— Over the past few decades, Americans have begun to understand that doctors' work doesn't always mean curing or preventing disease. Palliative and hospice care, which only became distinct medical subspecialties in 2006, center on providing comfort and improving the quality of ...

“Tony Lazzeri: Yankees Legend and Baseball Pioneer” by Lawrence Baldassaro; University of Nebraska Press (352 pages, $34.95) ——— Before DiMaggio, there was Lazzeri. A home run hero, Tony Lazzeri was essential to the Yankees’ legendary Murderers’ Row. A son of immigrants, he broadened the game’s appeal and gave millions of Italian-Americans a role model. He was a shy, serious gentleman who did ...

"A Gambling Man" by David Baldacci; Grand Central Publishing (448 pages, $29) ——— International best-selling author David Baldacci — best known for his hard-charging contemporary thrillers — takes a step back into the past with “A Gambling Man,” his second, hard-charging historical thriller featuring World War II veteran Aloysius Archer. Set in 1949, the post WWII era is as much a character as ...

Reading mysteries in the spring always feels pleasantly off-key; disappearing into darkness at a time when things are becoming lighter. Janelle Brown's "Pretty Things," which this month kept my eyes glued to the pages and away from things blooming outside (just as well; spring makes me sneeze), brought some appealing chill. It's both psychological thriller and old-house saga; said house being ...

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