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Stress

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NEW YORK (AP) — It was anxiety — and not a problem with the shots — that caused fainting, dizziness and other short-term reactions in dozens of people at coronavirus vaccine clinics in five states, U.S. health officials have concluded.

The pandemic has stretched human coping skills so thin that experts fear many of us may soon snap, leaving people around the world coping with a mental health crisis of catastrophic proportions.

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There aren’t many don’ts for starting up a milkweed patch, Hasle said, but one plant to avoid is tropical milkweed, a nonnative plant that flowers late in the season. The best garden is one you can sustain, Hasle said. And it can make for a fun family project.

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Did you know plants reduce stress and anxiety? Plus, they smell and look good. Sometimes, we can tend to view them as fairly nonessential and only really necessary for special occasions. Consider Treat Yo’ Self that special occasion. Order yourself a bouquet, and send yourself a lovely line of encouragement.

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While the pandemic has prevented many people from wanting to travel, mental health experts encourage getting out of your bubble. Enter the staycation. If you live near the coast, take advantage of a beachfront Airbnb. Many rentals run by third-party services have stringent cleaning and safety protocols.

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The pandemic has forced many to slow down their daily routines and connect to simpler processes. Remember the popularity of baking sourdough bread? Well, just as that required a recipe, there’s a method for elevating a simple bath to a healing experience, according to Deborah Hanekamp, author of the book “Ritual Baths: Be Your Own Healer.”

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While it might be difficult, it doesn’t hurt to seek the silver lining. For example, while you may miss your annual birthday bash, you probably won’t miss the stress of hosting or the extra expense of putting on the event.

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Stress is another known risk factor for heart disease. A 2001 study found that pet ownership in conjunction with treatment with an ACE inhibitor did more to reduce stress-related blood pressure spikes than ACE inhibitor treatment alone. A 2007 study found that in people hospitalized for advanced heart failure, blood pressure and levels of certain stress hormones dropped after a 12-minute visit from a therapy dog.

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