Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Newspapers

  • Updated

The Las Vegas Review-Journal is demanding that authorities don’t review a slain reporter’s electronic devices, which were seized by authorities after his death. The newspaper argues Jeff German's cellphone, four computers and hard drive contain confidential sources and unpublished materials protected by federal and state law. Officials say they could be used in the prosecution and defense of German’s alleged killer. Robert Telles, a Clark County public administrator who recently lost his re-election bid, is accused of stabbing German outside his home earlier this month. German had reported on accusations of bullying and hostility by Telles in his office.

  • Updated

A local elected official got court-appointed attorneys during his arraignment in the stabbing death of a Las Vegas investigative journalist who wrote articles critical of him and his managerial conduct. Clark County Public Administrator Robert Telles stood Tuesday in shackles while he was charged with murder in the Sept. 2 killing of veteran Las Vegas Review-Journal staff writer Jeff German. A judge scheduled an Oct. 26 hearing of evidence, and said Telles will remain jailed without bail. Clark County District Attorney Steve Wolfson announced he's seeking a court order to remove Telles from his elected position heading the county office that handles assets of people who die without a will or family contacts. Such court action could take several weeks.

  • Updated

An unofficial tribunal organized by a group of media freedom organizations has declared Mexico, Sri Lanka and Syria guilty of violating international humanitarian law for failing to protect journalists. The People’s Tribunal on the Murder of Journalists, which no legal authority, delivered a judgment aimed at holding the governments accountable. Relatives holding photos of slain journalists on Monday watched from the pews of a 17th-century church in The Hague used for the proceedings. None of the governments submitted any defense for the unofficial trial despite being invited to do so. The media rights groups spent a year investigating the killings of three journalists.

  • Updated

An elected official accused of killing a Las Vegas investigative journalist in what authorities allege was retaliation for articles critical of him and his office faced court sanctions two years ago for resisting arrest in a domestic violence case. Records obtained Tuesday show that Robert Telles, the Clark County public administrator, accepted a plea agreement in September 2020. The case was dismissed and closed in March 2021 after Telles paid a fine, attended counseling and stayed out of trouble. Telles is now jailed without bail on suspicion of murder in the Sept. 2 slaying of veteran Las Vegas Review-Journal staff writer Jeff German. His next court appearance is Sept. 20.

  • Updated

A federal judge in Phoenix has blocked enforcement of a new Arizona law restricting the filming of police. U.S. District Judge John Tuchi agreed with the American Civil Liberties Union and multiple media organizations that the law appeared to violate the First Amendment. He issued a preliminary injunction Friday. The law was slated to take effect Sept. 24. Republican Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich and the prosecutor and sheriff’s office in Maricopa County told the judge they would not defend the law. The judge gave the Legislature a week to decide if it will do so. Bystander cellphone videos are largely credited with revealing police misconduct and reshaping the conversation around police transparency.

  • Updated

Investigative reporter Jeff German took on the powerful in four decades of writing about the Las Vegas underworld and government corruption. But police say it was one of his latest targets, a county administrator, who fatally stabbed German last weekend. The killing came months after German had written about bullying, favoritism and an inappropriate relationship within an obscure public office. Authorities said Thursday that DNA at the crime scene linked Clark County Public Administrator Robert Telles to the killing. Police arrested him Wednesday after a brief standoff at his home. Telles was the focus of German’s reporting in the Las Vegas Review-Journal as he sought reelection.

  • Updated

Police and prosecutors say the DNA of a jailed elected official angered by past and upcoming newspaper stories was found beneath the fingernails of a Las Vegas investigative reporter who fought for his life while being stabbed to death outside his home last week. Clark County Public Administrator Robert Telles stood handcuffed in court while a prosecutor told a judge Thursday that Las Vegas Review-Journal reporter Jeff German’s death was a planned attack by an assailant who waited in his vehicle outside the reporter's home. The prosecutor said German was stabbed seven times. The judge called a police report detailing the attack “chilling” and ordered the 45-year-old Telles to remain jailed without bail pending arraignment next Tuesday on a murder charge.

  • Updated

A Las Vegas-area elected public official has been arrested in the fatal stabbing of a veteran newspaper reporter whose investigations of the official’s work preceded his primary loss in June. Clark County Public Administrator Robert “Rob” Telles, a Democrat, was taken into custody at his home by a police SWAT unit hours after investigators served a search warrant and confiscated vehicles in the criminal probe of the killing of Las Vegas Review-Journal reporter Jeff German, Sheriff Joe Lombardo told the newspaper. Investigators earlier served a search warrant and confiscated vehicles in the homicide investigation. Telles had been a focus of German’s reporting about turmoil in the county office that handles property of people who die without a will or family contacts.

  • Updated

Brian McGrory, under whose leadership The Boston Globe won three newsroom Pulitzer Prizes, is stepping down after 10 years at the helm to become chair of Boston University’s journalism department. McGrory on Wednesday called his time as editor an honor. He started at the Globe in 1989 and was named top editor in 2012 when it was owned by The New York Times Co., which at one point threatened to shut down the paper. He was retained by new owners John Henry — principal owner of the Boston Red Sox — and Linda Henry, who is currently the Globe’s chief executive.

  • Updated

FICTION: War and peace surge through the pages of a Nobel laureate's captivating, brilliant new novel. "Afterlives" by Abdulrazak Gurnah; Riverhead (320 pages, $28) ——— One of the most awe-inspiring developments in our contemporary literature is the surpassing brilliance of Anglophone African novelists, from Nigeria's Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to Zambia's Namwali Serpell to Zimbabwe's Petina ...

  • Updated

Police have released a photo of a vehicle that may be linked in the fatal stabbing of a Las Vegas newspaper’s investigator reporter. They also said Las Vegas Review-Journal reporter Jeff German apparently was killed Friday and not Saturday as police previously reported. The 69-year-old German was found stabbed to death outside his home after authorities received a 911 call. Police say German apparently was in an altercation with another person that led to the stabbing and it was an isolated incident. They believe the suspect was in the area earlier casing for other crimes.

  • Updated

Police have released surveillance images of a possible suspect in the fatal stabbing of a Las Vegas newspaper’s investigative reporter, although the images don’t show the person’s full face. The images distributed Monday by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department show a person wearing a wide straw hat, bright orange reflective long-sleeve shirt, blue jeans, gray shoes and carrying a black or dark blue shoulder bag. Police are asking for the public’s help finding any additional surveillance footage as they continue to search for whoever killed Las Vegas Review-Journal reporter Jeff German. The 69-year-old German was found stabbed to death outside his home around 10:30 a.m. Saturday after authorities received a 911 call.

  • Updated

A court in Moscow has found a former journalist guilty of treason and sentenced him to 22 years in a maximum security prison. The ruling Monday concluded a trial that has been widely seen as politically motivated. The sentence handed to Ivan Safronov is among the harshest moves against Russian independent journalists and Kremlin critics who have faced mounting pressure in recent years. Safronov worked as a defense and space reporter for a decade before becoming an adviser to the head of the Russian space corporation Roscosmos. Safronov was accused of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and information about the Russian military to a German national. Safronov insisted on his innocence.

  • Updated

A court in Moscow has upheld a motion from Russian authorities to revoke the license of a top independent newspaper that for years has been critical of the Kremlin. It's the latest move in a months-long crackdown on independent media, opposition activists and human rights groups. The ruling Monday against Novaya Gazeta comes amid Russia’s grinding military campaign in Ukraine and the Kremlin’s effort to silence critics of what it calls a “special military operation.” Dmitry Muratov is the Nobel Peace Prize-winning editor-in-chief of the newspaper. He called the ruling on Monday “political” and “not having the slightest legal basis.” Muratov promised to contest it. Novaya Gazeta is Russia’s most renowned independent newspaper.

  • Updated

Authorities say a Las Vegas investigative reporter has been stabbed to death outside his home and police are searching for a suspect. The Las Vegas Review-Journal says officers found journalist Jeff German dead with stab wounds around 10:30 a.m. Saturday after authorities received a 911 call. Authorities say it appears the 69-year-old German was in an altercation with another person that led to the stabbing. German joined the Review-Journal in 2010 after more than two decades at the Las Vegas Sun, where he was a columnist and reporter who covered courts, politics, labor, government and organized crime.

  • Updated

CNN White House correspondent John Harwood says he’s exiting the news channel. In a tweet Friday, he says he was proud of the work he'd done. His departure comes amid other significant changes at CNN. Last month, CNN canceled its weekly “Reliable Sources” media analysis show after three decades on the air, and host Brian Stelter left the network. The network is making a move to be less confrontational politically. Harwood came to CNN from CNBC. He previously worked at the St. Petersburg Times and the Wall Street Journal. Harwood said he looked forward to figuring out what's next. CNN said in a statement that it appreciated Harwood's work.

  • Updated

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt has filed an open records request seeking emails between two journalism professors and a fact-checking organization. Schmitt's office is seeking three years of some emails sent by the professors and the executive director of PolitiFact while they worked at the Columbia Missourian on the University of Missouri campus. A Schmitt spokesman said the office is "trying to get to the bottom of the fact-checking process." University officials say an outside legal firm is determining which emails will be released to the attorney general. Most private media outlets aren't subject to open records requests, but the Missourian could be because it's linked to a public university.

  • Updated

Barbara Ehrenreich, the author, activist and self-described “myth buster” who in such notable works as “Nickel and Dimed” and “Bait and Switch” challenged conventional thinking about class, religion and the very idea of an American dream, has died at age 81. A prolific author who regularly turned out books and newspaper and magazine articles, she was a longtime proponent of liberal causes from economic equality to abortion rights. For “Nickel and Dimed,” she worked in minimum wage jobs so she could learn firsthand the struggles of the working poor, whom she called “the major philanthropists of our society.”

  • Updated

The Republican candidate for governor in Wisconsin endorsed by Donald Trump is calling for people to take up “pitchforks and torches” in reaction to a story that detailed his giving to anti-abortion groups and others. Democrats and the campaign of Gov. Tony Evers say that Tim Michels is threatening violence. Michels spokesperson Anna Kelly is downplaying his remarks, saying “only political hacks and media accomplices would freak out about Tim using a figure of speech.” His comments on a conservative talk radio show come amid a strong pushback to a story published earlier this week by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel detailing his charitable giving.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News