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Mother’s Day gifts kids can make themselves: Paper flower bouquet
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Mother’s Day gifts kids can make themselves: Paper flower bouquet

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Wrap all the flowers in a cardboard roll and finish by tying the ribbon into a bow. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

We always get our mom flowers for Mother’s Day to thank her for taking care of us. This year, we’re going to give mom a bouquet of paper flowers. These paper flowers are great for three reasons: We made them, they will last forever, and they don’t need water.

YOU WILL NEED:

  • Colored paper (letter size)
  • Beads
  • Hot glue gun (Ask an adult for help.)
  • Scissors
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Cardboard toilet paper roll
  • Ribbon

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Cut four squares from each piece of paper (approximately 4-inch squares).

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Cut four squares from each piece of paper. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

2. Take one square and fold it in half diagonally to form a triangle.

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Take one square and fold it in half diagonally to form a triangle. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

3. Next, fold each end into the middle to create a rectangle.

4. Place your finger inside the rectangle you just folded. Open it up so that it is a triangle again, and flatten it.

5. Flip the triangle over. Repeat steps 3 and 4 on the other side of the triangle.

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Fold each end into the middle to create a rectangle. Place your finger inside the rectangle you just folded. Open it up so that it is a triangle again, and flatten it. Flip the triangle over. Repeat. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

6. Use the glue gun to glue the outside edges together to create a circular flower head.

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Use the glue gun to glue the outside edges together to create a circular flower head. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

7. Once the glue has dried, open the flat petal into a circular, 3D shape. This is one flower petal.

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Once the glue has dried, open the flat petal into a circular, 3D shape. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

8. Repeat steps 2-7 four more times to make the rest of the petals.

9. Glue all five petals together in a circle, gluing the outside of each petal to the next. When the last petal is glued to the outside of the first, you will have one flower.

10. Finish by gluing a bead in the center of the flower and a pipe cleaner to the base of the flower to create the stem.

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Glue all five petals together in a circle, gluing the outside of each petal to the next. When the last petal is glued to the outside of the first, you will have one flower. Finish by gluing a bead in the center of the flower and a pipe cleaner to the base of the flower to create the stem. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

11. Repeat all steps as many times as you’d like to create a bunch of flowers.

12. Wrap all the flowers in a cardboard roll and finish by tying the ribbon into a bow.

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Repeat all steps as many times as you’d like to create a bunch of flowers. (Courtesy Rebecca Warren/iGeneration Youth/TNS)

SPECIAL TIP:

Use different colored paper for the best impact. The more flowers you make, the more impressive the final bouquet will look.

Maisie and Lydia Warren are iGeneration Youth reporters living in Bristol, U.K. Read more stories at igenerationyouth.com.

©2020 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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